Dr. Kitchens-Kintz: An Inspiring Biology Professor

Dr. Kitchens-Kintz is the head of East Stroudsburg University’s Biology Department. Photo Credit / Briana Magistro
Dr. Kitchens-Kintz is the head of East Stroudsburg University’s Biology Department. Photo Credit / Briana Magistro

Dr. Kitchens-Kintz is the head of East Stroudsburg University’s Biology Department.
Photo Credit / Briana Magistro

BY BRIANA MAGISTRO

SC Staff Writer

Many professors have the ability to captivate their students, creating an enjoyable educational experience.

One of these professors is Dr. Kitchens-Kintz, the head of the Biology Department here at East Stroudsburg University.

She teaches a number of introductory biology classes, as well as Molecular Biotechnology.

Dr. Kitchens-Kintz was born in the suburbs of Atlanta, Georgia. At the age of ten, her family moved to the Georgia countryside. Quickly, Dr. Kitchens-Kintz had to adjust to the life of a country girl.

When asked about how schooling in the country compared to city schools, Dr. Kitchens-Kintz said, “The education slowed down. It didn’t stop, but it slowed down. In the Atlanta schools, I was learning French.”

During her senior year of high school, Dr. Kitchens-Kintz decided that she wanted to go to college. She, nor her parents, had the money required for higher education, but she knew that the military had great college programs.

“I’d always been fascinated with the military,” she said. After joining the Navy at the age of eighteen, Dr. Kitchens-Kintz was stationed in Memphis, Tennessee, where she completed courses at an electronics technician school.

She was then stationed in Norfolk, Virginia, working on a surface ship simulator. According to Dr. Kitchens-Kintz, “That means that I actually mopped floors!”

After a few years, she attended the State University of West Georgia for what she actually wanted to do—that is, to be a biologist. She received her B.S. in Biology and then attended the University of South Carolina to receive her PhD.

While earning her PhD, Dr. Kitchens-Kintz worked with mice in a laboratory.

“I did my job, and it’s something I didn’t like. But given the chance now that I don’t have to work with animals, I’m not!”

Dr. Kitchens-Kintz studied the performance of an E. Coli gene that was placed in mice, and then tracked whether the gene was passed on through multiple generations. She then taught at the University of South Carolina for a few years before coming to East Stroudsburg University.

“I decided to give teaching a try and loved it,” she said.

After being asked what her favorite part of East Stroudsburg University is, Dr. Kitchens-Kintz said, “The students. I love to see them go on to their careers and do what they want to do. By the time they’re seniors, they’re adults. Don’t call yourself kids anymore!”

As for advice for college students, she said, “Have confidence in your own self.”

Email Briana at:

bmagistro@live.esu.edu

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