The Menzingers Release New Album to Positive Reviews

The Menzingers performed at Hare & Hounds in Birmingham in 2012. Photo Courtesy / Steve Watkins
The Menzingers performed at Hare & Hounds in Birmingham in 2012. Photo Courtesy / Steve Watkins
The Menzingers performed at Hare & Hounds in Birmingham in 2012. Photo Courtesy / Steve Watkins

The Menzingers performed at Hare & Hounds in Birmingham in 2012.
Photo Courtesy / Steve Watkins

By Lauren Shook
A&E Editor

The Menzingers released their newest album, “After the Party,” on Feb. 3. The punk rock band with roots in Scranton, Pa., released the 13-track album to positive reviews.

The overall vibe of the album is upbeat, with occasional sentimental lyrics and feelings of reminiscing the good ol’ days.

With catchy rhythms and melodies, it’s hard not to nod and sing along to these new songs.

The first track of the album, “Tellin’ Lies,” features Greg Barnett’s gravelly voice, which perfectly complements the funky bass and fast-paced guitar strumming.

Although this song mainly reveals uncertainties about not knowing what they’re going to do now that they’re out of their twenties, I still feel that plenty of students could relate to this song.

Sure, many current students are still in their twenties, or even younger. But the same anxieties apply.

Upon graduation, seniors are worrying about their futures and potential careers.

We wonder, “what are we going to do now that graduation is over,” rather than “where are we gonna go now that our twenties are over?”

The second track, “Thick as Thieves,” features an intro with powerful electric chords sure to get your head bobbing.

“Lookers” features some reminiscing. The first stanza is slow and sweet before the tempo picks back up to a faster beat.

Barnett sings, “Jersey girls are always total heartbreakers, Julie from the Wonder Bar, I still wonder where you are.”

In case you were wondering, The Wonder Bar is a pretty well-known bar in Asbury Park, N.J.

Bruce Springstien and Bon Jovi both performed at The Stone Pony. Photo Courtesy / Kezee

Bruce Springstien and Bon Jovi both performed at The Stone Pony.
Photo Courtesy / Kezee

This is one of my favorite parts of the album. The band’s roots can be found once in a while through the lyrics, providing bits and pieces of wellknown areas in the Northeast.

“Midwestern States” is one of the tracks that I enjoyed most from this album. The lyrics are extremely relatable to virtually anyone whose college career is drawing to an end.

Barnett sings, “we both got worthless diplomas from worthless universities. Two bachelors in worthless studies, but at least it made our parents happy, and cost a whole lot of money.”

I think we can all feel the struggle of finishing up college with the weight of student loans on our shoulders.

Another one of my personal favorites was “Charlie’s Army.” The song tells a story; and an amusing one at that.

This guy is in love with his girlfriend. However, he’s also managed to get on her ex’s bad side, ensuring a future scuffle.

“Black Mass” changes up the feeling of the album a bit. It provides a different, slower tempo and adds some tambourine. It delivers a nice change of pace to the otherwise fast-paced album.

If you’re at all familiar with the Scranton, Pa., area then you should absolutely give “Bad Catholics” a listen.

The Menzingers debuted this song at a hometown show at The Vault Tap and Kitchen, which was recorded and posted to YouTube by NEPA Scene, an Arts and Entertainment site that focuses on Northeastern Pennsylvania.

“Your Wild Years” also features its own “Easter eggs.” The Stone Pony and Walt Whitman Bridge are both well-known places in the Northeast mentioned in the song.

A majority of the album is upbeat, which is just what you need to keep you sane the rest of winter.

“After the Party” is available to purchase from iTunes and can be streamed for free via Spotify through their website, themenzingers.com.

Give the album a listen! It’s the perfect blend of punk rock and hometown.

Email Lauren at:
lshook2@live.esu.edu

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