Procrastination Takes a Toll on Grades
Easy Ways to Avoid Stress and Stay on Track

Focus on your studies with a planner, colored pens and no phones. Photo Credit / Kayla Sutter
Focus on your studies with a planner, colored pens and no phones. Photo Credit / Kayla Sutter
Focus on your studies with a planner, colored pens and no phones. Photo Credit / Kayla Sutter

Focus on your studies with a planner, colored pens and no phones.
Photo Credit / Kayla Sutter

By Kevin Harris III
Staff Writer

One of the biggest diseases flying around our campus right now would be known as procrastination.

Procrastination does not affect all students, but a mass majority has dealt with this on at least one occasion in their college and even high school
careers.

Procrastination is the act of delaying or postponing an activity, such as homework, until further notice.

This can occur because the vast majority of college students do not own a planner or have good study habits.

Now procrastination definitely attacks the topic of studying.

We find that a lot of students either cram at the last minute and risk failing or just do not study at all.

Some students can study for hours at a time, and some students can study for the shortest amount of time and still receive the same grade on a quiz or exam.

Now the question is how is this possible?

You would expect the student who studies more to score a higher grade.

There are many factors to how a student will set up their study habits.

Whether it is how easy the class is, how the teacher grades, or it can even depend on what major you are in.

I have been able to ask people of different majors and grade groups.

It turns out from the answers that I have received that the student who have to study the most are the students affiliated with some kind of medical or
science related major.

Now majors require some kind of studying, but it all can also depend on the student and how well they pick up the subject at hand.

There are always different circumstances that can predict how a student should study, but in my opinion every student should study for at least two hours a
day, or study for half the time of each class.

For example, if you have a class that is 50 minutes long then you should study for that class for 25 minutes.

If anything, you should at least go over the notes that you have in that class for at least 15 minutes if nothing else seems to work for you.

Now do not get me wrong, there is a such thing as too much studying.

With too much studying you can lose social interaction which can be essential for a college student, or you can run the risk of overloading your memory and
blank out when the time of a test comes around.

How often do you study?

Do you study too often or too little?

Do you let it affect your everyday life?

Here is a more essential question to ask yourself; do you have a planner?

If you answered no to the last question, I suggest you find one as soon as possible because a planner can be essential for the life and schedule of a
college student.

Email Kevin at:
kharris17@live.esu.edu

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