‘X-Scapes’ Exhibit Explores Collage Art and Landscape

Molina Washington uses more than just paper in these captivating images. Photo Credit / Yaasmeen Piper
Molina Washington uses more than just paper in these captivating images. Photo Credit / Yaasmeen Piper
Molina Washington uses more than just paper in these captivating images. Photo Credit / Yaasmeen Piper

Molina Washington uses more than just paper in these captivating images.
Photo Credit / Yaasmeen Piper

By Yaasmeen Piper
Staff Writer

Artists Susan Molina Washington and Stephen Washington are featured in “Deconstructing the Urban and Pastoral Landscapes.” Several of their pieces are
currently being shown in ESU’s Modelon Powers Gallery located in the Fine and Performing Arts Center.

The goal of the exhibit, according to ESU’s website, is to “give paintings a new meaning by removing representative color until the scene becomes a motif
for expressive brushwork and the landscape becomes the medium itself.”

The pieces are unlike anything I have ever seen before. I read on ESU’s website that Susan Molina Washington previously was a fashion designer in New York
for 15 years, and her pieces reflected that.

The works were a collage of nude and pastel colors. Different arrays of fabric were embedded in the work as well as string, tape and buttons.

One of the pieces even had part of a tag from a women’s skirt.

Stephen Washington was born in England and studied at Southport College or Art and Hull College of Art. Before moving to the U.S., between 1982 and 1999 he
worked as a graphic designer and commercial photographer.

Currently, he is exploring landscape, oil and acrylic painting.

Washington states in his artist statement about the historyof landscape painting in Pennsylvania.Various artists from places such as Hudson Valley schools have used the DelawareRiver as their muse.

However, these landscapes are changing around us.

“Those of you have lived in the Poconos for a time will have no doubt seen the many changes to our local landscapes as this area evolves to meet the
challenges of the increasing population, and commercial activity,” Washington wrote in his statement.

Through his artistic eye, Washington watched the scenery before him change. The landscapes were now being affected by our industrial society, increasing
population and climate change.

“Trees like Apple, Cherry, and Pear together with Sugar Maple and Beech trees will begin to disappear by 2050 along with crops like corn. Lack of snow cover
and rain will affect native Spring flowers and declining diversity in tree species will result in poorer Fall.”

As well as creating something beautiful for his audience to behold, Washington’s work sends a message about what we are doing to our planet.

“In my own way I am hoping to capture something of the sense of a place before it evolves into another place and exist only in memory and in some artful
gestures on a small canvas.”

The exhibit will be open through March 10, and is free to the public.

Email Yaasmeen at:
ypiper@live.esu.edu

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