Classic Ballet, ‘Napoli,’ Graces ESU Campus

The ballet was performed in the Cecilia S. Cohen Recital Hall in the Fine and Performing Arts Center. Photo Credit / Lauren Shook
The ballet was performed in the Cecilia S. Cohen Recital Hall in the Fine and Performing Arts Center. Photo Credit / Lauren Shook
The ballet was performed in the Cecilia S. Cohen Recital Hall in the Fine and Performing Arts Center. Photo Credit / Lauren Shook

The ballet was performed in the Cecilia S. Cohen Recital Hall in the Fine and Performing Arts Center.
Photo Credit / Lauren Shook

By Charlese Freeman
Staff Writer

The Cecilia S. Cohen Recital Hall hosted a viewing of some cultural dance, the classic “Napoli,” also called “The Fisherman and His Bride,” from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 22.

Ballet “Napoli’s” first premier was by the Royal Danish Ballet in Copenhagen on March 29, 1842 by Danish choreographer and ballet master August Bournonville.

August Bournonville was a Danish ballet master and choreographer. He was the son of Antoine Bournonville, a dancer and choreographer.

Following studies in Paris as a young man, Bournonville became a solo dancer at the Royal Ballet in Copenhagen.

From 1830 to 1848, he was choreographer for the Royal Danish Ballet, for which he created more than 50 ballets admired for their exuberance, lightness and beauty.

During this time, point dancing, when the dancers balance on their toes for a certain amount of time, was fairly new.

He initiated a unique style in ballet known as the Bournonville School. Although his work was inspired by those of Paris, it was completely original.

This ballet tells a beautiful story of Teresina, a young Italian girl who falls in love with Gennaro, a fisherman. The tale culminates in the marriage of the lovers.

When a storm hits Gennaro and Teresina, Gennaro looks everywhere for Teresina and eventually finds her in The Blue Grotto, a magical place ruled by Golfo who has turned Teresina into a Naiad (Fairy of the Sea.)

However, Teresina cannot remember Gennaro. Once Gennaro breaks the spell, Teresina remembers him and they go on to get married.

Students were able to experience a culture of dance that may not be as popular today as it was years ago. However, this presentation was a great way for both ballet enthusiasts and non-ballet enthusiasts to learn and expand their thinking.

Email Charlese at:
cfreeman2@live.esu.edu

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