Review Reveals Substance Statistic
Drug and Alcohol Violations on the Rise

Biennial review suggests that scenes like this might be too common on campus. Photo Credit / Bill Cameron
Biennial review suggests that scenes like this might be too common on campus. Photo Credit / Bill Cameron
Biennial review suggests that scenes like this might be too common on campus. Photo Credit / Bill Cameron

Biennial review suggests that scenes like this might be too common on campus.
Photo Credit / Bill Cameron

By Erin McGuire
Staff Writer

On Jan. 19, ESU students received an email summarizing the school’s adoption and implementation of an alcohol and other drug prevention program for students and faculty.

The email itself was filled with many different links and complicated words that made it difficult to read for some which likely lead to many ignoring the email.

According to the biennial review, drug and alcohol violations on campus have been increasing, so it is important to address the policies and issues.

EDGAR Part 86 was put into effect in 1986.

It states that schools must inform their students and faculty members of the standards of conduct prohibiting possession and distribution of drugs and alcohol and any local and federal laws.

The act also states all resources that are offered to students and faculty members, including treatment and counseling. A biennial review determines the effectiveness and ensures that the school is enforcing disciplinary acts.

ESU is a dry campus, meaning there are no illicit drugs or alcohol allowed on campus. If any student or faculty member were to be caught with any illicit drugs or alcohol, a series of disciplinary actions would be enforced.

Another main part of EDGAR is to notify students and staff members of the programs that are available to them if they are worried they have a problem.

According to the Biennial Review of 2013-2014 and 2014-2015, “the overall mission is to reinforce the academic charge of ESU by planning, coordinating, and supporting the campus efforts that reduce dangerous and illegal drug and alcohol use. The goal is to inform students and arm them with honest knowledge to make better overall choices while in school and after graduation.”

Ayson Patascher, Health Education and AToD Prevention Coordinator, wants to make it clear that this was not only for students. All of the resources named in the review offered to students are offered to all faculty members as well.

For anyone who thinks they, or someone they know, may have a problem, there are several different resources available to help.

The Biennial Review states, “the Department of Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) offers a range of counseling services designed to enhance the educational, vocational, personal, social and emotional well-being of students.”

It is also important to know that if a student has a family member struggling with addiction, that would like to get help, they can go to CAPS as well.

Another resource available is the University’s Health Center, which offers information and referrals to students who are struggling with alcohol, tobacco or other drug issues. This is also available for any student who would like to educate his or her self.

Further information on EDGAR Part 86 and the biennial review is available on ESU’s website.
The email received by students stated that copies of the biennial review may be requested on the second floor of the Flagler-Metzgar Center.

For those with any further questions or concerns on this topic, contact Alyson Patascher at apatascher@esu.edu or (570) 422-3298.

Email Erin at:
emccguire@live.esu.edu

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.